Fashionable Watches

How To Set Up Your Analog Wall Clock

How To Set Up Your Analog Wall Clock


Hello, and welcome to the La Crosse Technology family. Today we’re going to walk you through the
setup and basic functions of your analog wall clock. So, let’s jump right in. Now, we have quite a variety of clocks on
the market. But from simple to advanced, each analog clock
will come equipped with what’s call a “movement.” This is the heart of any clock, and controls
how the hands operate. The vast majority of our wall clocks will
fall into one of the following four movement categories: Non-Atomic, Type A, Type B, or UltrAtomic. We’ll go through each of these individually,
starting at the times listed. But just a few notes before we begin: The last three on this list are all equipped
with an antenna, and have the ability to receive the WWVB radio signal transmitted by the NIST. This signal is used to synchronize your device to the exact time via the official atomic clock located in
Fort Collins, Colorado. This is what is meant by our “Atomic Time”
or “Radio Controlled” branding. We’ll include a link below for more specific
information on the NIST and the WWVB radio signal. Another thing to note is that any of these
movements may also come equipped with extra battery compartments, typically placed around
the sides. In most cases, each extra battery will provide
about a year of additional use. And finally, if you notice your clock hands
randomly spinning, this can mean a couple of things. First, if your hands spin around the hours
once or twice and then stop at the correct time, this is the clock simply auto correcting itself to the exact time after receiving the WWVB radio signal. This is a normal function. But, if your hands are continuously spinning,
or not moving at all, this is typically a sign to change the batteries, as they are likely under or over powered. Now that we got all that out of the way, let’s begin. Starting with our simplest Non-Atomic movement,
the process is pretty straight forward. Install 1 new AA alkaline battery into the
back of the movement, there may be spots for more depending on your model. After this, use the Time Set Wheel to manually
move the hands to the correct time. The movement will then keep the clock running accurately until it is in need of a battery change. This type of movement is most commonly found
on our decorative La Crosse Clock or Equity designs. Moving on to our Type A movement. First, if your clock has a battery cover, make sure to remove this to gain access to the movement itself. Next, install a new alkaline battery into
the center battery compartment. If you have additional battery slots, like
we do here, feel free to install batteries there as well for extended battery life. Once powered on, you’ll notice the clock’s
hands will start to spin. These will stop at either 4 o’clock, 8 o’clock,
or 12 o’clock and remain in that position until the WWVB radio time signal is received. For some locations, this can take up to five nights. For the best reception, place the clock on
an exterior wall or near a window with the front or back of it facing Fort Collins, Colorado. Moving it away from other electronics can
help as well. But once the signal is received, the clock
will set to its default, Pacific Time. Since this movement was designed
for use within the US, the available options are PT for Pacific Time, MT for Mountain Time, CT for Central Time, and ET for Eastern Time. Adjust this to your time zone by firmly pressing
and holding the appropriate Time Zone Button until the hands begin to spin. Once they do, let go of the button. If you live in an area that does not follow
Daylight Saving Time, once your hands begin to spin, you’ll also
want to press the small button located here, one time. This will turn off the DST function. After all this, your clock should be up and
running properly and set to the correct time. This, of course, is assuming your clock was
able to receive the WWVB radio transmission. But if its been over five days and your clock
still has yet to show signs of life, you may unfortunately be in a tough location for this radio signal to reach. In this situation, it may be best to simply
manually set the time. Here’s how to do this: First, remove the batteries from the clock, press the Set Tab 20 times, and then wait at least 15 minutes before powering back up the movement. After this time, reinstall the batteries. Allow the hands to spin again and wait until
they are stopped at the 4, 8, or 12 o’clock position. Once they stop, you’ll want to move quickly
here as you’ll have about a two minute window to set your time manually. To do this, simply press and hold the Set
Tab to spin the hands into your current time position. Once there, release the tab. The clock will then begin to run accurately
from this time. We should note that setting your time manually on this movement will not stop it from searching for the WWVB signal. This will continue to happen automatically
in the background, and if it does pick up the signal in the future, it will override your manual time settings. So, if you notice your time is off by a few
hours in the future, this is likely what happened. Simply press and hold the correct Time Zone Button until the hands begin to spin, and it should set to your correct time. Next up, is our Type B Movement. The first step here will be to select your
Time Zone and Daylight Saving Time options using the switches on the bottom. Since this movement was designed for use within
the US, the available time zones are P for Pacific Time, M for Mountain Time, C for Central Time, and E for Eastern Time. Adjust to your time zone by simply sliding
the switch to the correct letter. And if you live in an area that does not follow
Daylight Saving Time, you’ll want to make sure you have the DST switch set to OFF. But for most places, you’ll likely want this left ON. Once you have these set correctly, install
a new alkaline battery into the center compartment. If you have a movement with additional battery
slots, like we do here, feel free to install batteries there as well for extended battery life. Once powered on, the second hand will begin to spin, it will rotate all the way around and stop at the 12. At this point, the hands will then start to
rotate, and do the same thing until they are all the way back around
in the 12 o’clock position. They will then stop and continue to search
for the WWVB signal for the next 8 minutes. If the signal is received, the time will set correctly according to the time zone and DST settings you had set via the switches. However, if the signal was not picked up
within these 8 minutes, the clock will then start to run from the 12 o’clock position. It can sometimes take up to 5 nights for the
clock to receive this radio transmission. For the best reception, place the clock on
an exterior wall or near a window with the front or back of it facing Fort Collins, Colorado. Moving it away from other electronics can
help as well. Once the signal is received, the clock will
set itself accurately according to your settings. Now, for most people this is how the clock
will function, picking up the signal and setting itself accurately within the first few nights. But, if its been 5 or more days
and your clock is still not set correctly, you may want to consider adjusting it manually. To do this, simply press and hold the SET button. The hands will start to spin, and you can then keep holding the SET button until in the correct position, or press and release the SET button to move the hands slowly one step at a time. Once the correct time is reached, you should
be good to go. It will then keep the time accurately from
that point on. Or at least until the batteries need to be
changed. We should note that setting your time manually
on this movement will not stop it from searching for the WWVB signal. This will continue to happen automatically
in the background, and if it does pick up this signal in the future,
it will override your manual time setting. So, just to be safe, you’ll want to make sure
those switches are set correctly. Now for those of you who may be wondering,
the final two buttons we haven’t touched on, really shouldn’t come into play in most situations. The WAVE button will simply put your clock
back into the initial intense search mode, however, since the movement will continue
to search for the WWVB signal on its own, this shouldn’t need to be pressed. The RESET button on the other hand,
is useful in situations where your clock is not running properly and/or it is not responding to your other button presses. After you press the RESET button, the clock should function just as it did when you first installed the batteries. And finally, onto our UltrAtomic movement. This model was made to receive an enhanced
phase-modulated WWVB signal from the NIST. Allowing the clock to digitally process the
received signal even in the most challenging locations and in the harshest of conditions, always keeping your time accurate. With this design, you also get access to additional
custom time zones, and have the ability to save battery life
by running it in Eco Mode. Here’s a rundown of how to set this clock
up and use these different functions. First, slide the Time Zone Switch to your
correct time zone. PT stands for Pacific Time, MT Mountain Time,
CT Central Time, and ET for Eastern Time. If you live outside of these US time zones,
make sure to select the ET, or “Custom,” option here. This will allow you to adjust the clock to your correct your time zone after the reception is picked up. Next, slide the Daylight Saving Time, or DST Switch,
to the ON or OFF position, depending on whether you live in an area
that follows DST or not. After you have these two switches set correctly,
install at least 2 C alkaline batteries into the middle compartments. For continued use for up to 6 years, you can
fill the additional side compartments as well. Once powered on, the clock will begin searching for the WWVB radio signal, and its hands will begin to spin. If the signal is not picked up right away, the hands will eventually stop in either the 4:00, 8:00,
or 12:00 o’clock position. They will remain there until the signal is received. However, in most situations, this clock will pick up the signal and set to the correct time pretty quickly. With this model, you have the ability to set
the clock to any time zone from GMT 0 to -11. Once the clock has received the WWVB signal
and has set to Eastern Time, you can then use the SET button on the back to move the time forward until your correct hour is reached. Each press of the SET button will move the
clock forward 1 hour. Once at the correct time, you’re free to leave
the clock be. It will continue running accurately from the
time selected here. Now, inevitably, there are always situations
where having the ability to set the clock’s time manually is the best, or only option. Here’s how to set this up: Starting with no batteries in the clock, you’ll want to make sure and have the DST Switch
in the OFF or Q-Set position. Next, adjust the Time Zone Switch
to the Q-Mode position. Then, install your batteries into the clock. These will work the same way, requiring at
least 2 new C batteries in the center compartments. But once powered on, the clock’s hands will
again begin to spin until reaching either the 4:00, 8:00,
or 12:00 o’clock position. Once stopped, you can then press the SET button
to adjust the hands gradually step by step, or hold the SET button to adjust the them quickly. When you reach the correct time, slide the
DST Switch to the ON or Q-Run position. The Second Hand will start moving from the 12 and the clock will accurately keep time from this manually set position. It will not use or be affected by the WWVB
signal in this mode. Some other functions to note include: Sleep
Mode, Eco Mode, and low battery indication. Sleep Mode is a function that will keep the
clock’s connection to the WWVB signal saved without running the clock’s hands. This may be useful if you’re moving, or have a second home that you’re not in all of the time. Once the clock initially sets to the correct time, you can move the switch to this Sleep Mode. The hands will move to the 12 o’clock position and stay there until the Time Zone Switch
is adjusted again. Keeping the batteries installed, the hands will then rotate and set to your time again almost instantly. This can greatly extend the life of your batteries. Speaking of saving batteries, if you have
the Eco Mode Switch set to the ON position, the clock will not run the second hand between
the hours of 11:00pm and 5:00am. This will help conserve battery power power
and keep you clock running longer. If you happen to notice the second hand stopping
outside of these times, the clock may be set to a custom time zone
or running on a manually set time. Of course if you’d like the second hand to
remain running all of the time, simply move this Eco Mode Switch to the OFF position. And finally, the last thing to note about
this second hand is if you notice it stopped in the 6:00 o’clock position, this is an indication that the clock’s batteries are running low and should be changed soon. Whoa! We made it! We apologize for the long video, but we wanted
to make sure we covered all the features these different types of movements have to offer. And we sure hope this helped you to get your
La Crosse Technology, La Crosse Clock, or Equity analog clock set up and working correctly. But if you should have further questions
or would like more information, please just let us know in the YouTube comments section below or visit our website at LaCrosseTechnology.com. Thanks again for joining the family,
we’re glad you’re here.


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